The Best Dating App For Your Myers-Briggs Personality Type – Bustle

Relationship

Relationships
The truth about whether you’re better suited for Hinge or Tinder.
Navigating the world of dating apps can sometimes be disheartening, but let’s be honest — most people see it as a necessary evil. Meeting someone “in the wild” is a rare occurrence, especially in this slightly more antisocial post-lockdown era, so meeting a potential partner in the virtual world seems more likely. With that said, figuring out which dating app best suits you and your relationship goals can be tricky.
It may seem far-fetched, but using results from personality tests can be useful in this scenario. This is especially true when it comes to the ever-popular Myers-Briggs type indicator test (MBTI), aka the head honcho of personality tests. This baby reveals multiple factors that make up your personality, represented by four letters: There are extroverted (E) and introverted (I) social types; those who use sensing (S) vs. intuition (I) when processing info; thinking (T) or feeling (F)-based decision-makers; and judging (J) or perceiving (P) organization types.
As licensed professional clinical counselor Jenny Campagna says, this test can help you better understand yourself — which then benefits how you relate to others. “To be able to have some studied framework to say, ‘Hey that sounds like me’ or ‘That’s not true at all’ can be useful in terms of communication,” she previously told Bustle. So when you really think about it, learning about your MBTI type can really help you narrow down which dating app would be worth your time.
Based on the different elements of your MBTI type, certain apps might better suit your personality and how you prefer to connect with others. For example, focusing on whether you’re more of an “E” or an “I” can help you decide which app makes you feel more socially confident. Ultimately, Dr. Sam Zand, psychiatrist and co-founder and chief medical officer of Better U says, “The key is to raise self-awareness, communicate authentically with our partners, and help strengthen or balance each other.” Below, Dr. Zand shares insight into the best dating app for your Myers-Briggs type, divided into four main categories: analysts, diplomats, sentinels, and explorers.
Known as the “analysts”, these four Myers-Briggs types value logic and strategy when it comes to decision-making as well as in many other areas of their lives. Because of this, dating apps that focus on an advanced algorithm or matching process would be a great fit. Hinge’s algorithm is based on relationship science and offers features like “Standouts” that pick the top match options based on the information you provide and your swiping habits, so these left-brained types might find it to be an efficient app. Another option would be OKCupid, which compiles both the information you fill out in your profile and your answers to hundreds of dating-specific questions to show you the exact percentage of compatibility you have with the potential matches you swipe through — making it a dream come true for all the STEM folks in the dating pool.
Generally charismatic and magnetic people, the four “diplomats” would benefit from online spaces where they can really use their charm and kindness to find a potential partner. Although it gets a bad rap for being just a hookup app, Tinder could be a great place for the diplomats to flex their attractive personalities and leverage the massive amount of users to their romantic advantage. For the LGBTQ+ people of these types, the inclusive app Her allows users a safe space to make connections while feeling like their authentic selves, which can certainly create community — aka what the diplomats are all about.
For the commanding, practical “sentinels”, apps that focus more on building a strong foundation for a romantic connection would be suitable. “As far as profile structure, biographical content may appeal to the sensing personality,” says Dr. Zand, so finding an app with plenty of room for sharing info about yourself is helpful. Rather than aimlessly swiping or casual flirting without building something meaningful, these four types could use something like Match, which has been a tried-and-true way to find a relationship for decades. It offers features like uploading up to 26 photos (significantly more than all other apps) and suggests matches for you — kind of like a digital matchmaker. Facebook Dating is another one to explore, especially because it involves plenty of information from your Facebook profile to share with swipers in your area, and allows you to filter who you see based on several criteria, including hiding your profile from your FB friends (and on the more practical side, it’s free).
The bold and spontaneous “explorers” might often look for suitors who can match their vivacious energy. Although two of these types are still introverts, overall they lean more toward expression and adventure. According to Dr. Zand, people of this nature — especially extroverts — would appreciate the opportunity to initiate communication themselves, and have a knack for excitement in dating. “While the extrovert might be pegged for the bar scene, they may do very well with a flamboyant dating profile as well,” he says. Bumble in particular offers this exact opportunity to women and non-binary folk, who are charged with the onus of sending the first message to their matches within 24 hours. This makes it an attractive choice for the explorers and their gung-ho attitude. Another fitting dating app would be Feeld, which is an all-inclusive and safe space for open-minded, confident users. The app allows you to share your desires on your profile, which can be as reserved or kinky as you feel comfortable with.
For all MBTI types, however, Dr. Zand says that taking ownership and control of your own behaviors and decisions is key to a successful dating life. “Although we may have natural tendencies or preferences, we all have the power to choose our behaviors, balance our thoughts and patterns, and mold our personalities however we’d like,” he tells Bustle. With that in mind, have fun swiping.
Experts:
Jenny Campagna, licensed professional clinical counselor
Dr. Sam Zand, psychiatrist and Co-Founder/Chief Medical Officer of Better U
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