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It might seem at times that what we have or don’t have is based on chance. But as we come to understand God as the source of constant, unlimited goodness, we find our needs met in practical ways.

I recently heard a comment implying that the way our lives turn out – particularly what we have or don’t have – is based on chance or the random favor of a far-off God. I found myself pondering that statement for days afterward.
It didn’t fit with what I’ve been learning in Christian Science, which explains that our lives are the outcome of God’s universal goodness – that God made us in His image, and that all God created is spiritual and good. It stands to reason that the image, or reflection, of a constantly good God expresses the same constant goodness as its source. So God’s image, each of us, cannot be deprived of anything needed to thrive.
As we pray to see this more clearly, we are empowered to overcome the notion that supply is based on random circumstances and to prove in our own life God’s unlimited and impartial supply.
Ten years ago, my husband suddenly passed away. In addition to dealing with grief, I was unsure how I would continue to maintain my home and provide for my son, who was still in high school, since my husband had been the primary breadwinner. I had been working from home as a real estate agent for years, and my income had supplemented my husband’s. But I had never found enough business to meet our needs on my own.
In the early days after my husband’s passing, I often thought about the many good qualities he had expressed in providing for our family. I reasoned that his expression of those qualities and his ability to meet our family’s needs had stemmed from his true, spiritual nature as the reflection of God. And since everyone expresses God’s goodness in unique ways, those qualities couldn’t just disappear. They were still being provided to me by God.
As I prayed to see and to express these qualities more in my life, my needs were met in practical ways. Within a very short time, my real estate business increased, allowing me to keep my home and provide for my son in abundance.
Once my son left for college, I felt compelled to return to the corporate workforce, specifically in sales, an area I’d worked in before and where I would be able to collaborate with peers and earn a steadier income. But given my years away from the corporate world, I wondered if I could even get an interview, much less convince a manager to give me a chance.
Mary Baker Eddy, the discoverer of Christian Science, identifies Mind as a synonym for God. I reasoned that the idea to pursue a career in sales had come to me through my prayers, and therefore had been inspired by the divine Mind. So, this idea had to include all the intelligence needed to move forward in ways that would bless me and others. I could trust this Mind to continue to supply the ideas that would rightly guide me.
Mrs. Eddy writes in “Miscellaneous Writings 1883-1896”: “God gives you His spiritual ideas, and in turn, they give you daily supplies. Never ask for to-morrow: it is enough that divine Love is an ever-present help; and if you wait, never doubting, you will have all you need every moment” (p. 307).
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My prayers did indeed bring spiritual insights that lead to harmonious results, and I had what I needed. I got a job in sales, then progressed to other positions, advancing each time. Now, I am the director of sales for a highly successful global company. I have a rewarding relationship with my team of employees and the others on the leadership team. In short, I love my job.
Our lives – including our resources and supply – are not subject to chance or luck. When we acknowledge our Father-Mother God as our source of supply and trust divine Mind to provide the ideas that we need to direct us, we experience more fully the unlimited good God has given us all, and our needs are met in practical ways.
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A selection of the most viewed stories this week on the Monitor’s website.
Every Saturday
Hear about special editorial projects, new product information, and upcoming events.
Occasional
Select stories from the Monitor that empower and uplift.
Every Weekday
An update on major political events, candidates, and parties twice a week.
Twice a Week
Stay informed about the latest scientific discoveries & breakthroughs.
Every Tuesday
A weekly digest of Monitor views and insightful commentary on major events.
Every Thursday
Latest book reviews, author interviews, and reading trends.
Every Friday
A weekly update on music, movies, cultural trends, and education solutions.
Every Thursday
The three most recent Christian Science articles with a spiritual perspective.
Every Monday
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