Readiness and resiliency through fitness – acc.af.mil

Fitness


Billy Miles, Legends Fitness Center manager, coaches a core strengthening class at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, April 24, 2022. Miles offers personal training and teaches various lifting and core strengthening classes each week. “I take great pride in listening to the patrons and acquiring specific equipment or offering fitness classes to help them meet their goals,” said Miles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Parr)
Tech. Sgt. Adam Angus, 332d Expeditionary Contracting Squadron non-commissioned officer in charge of future plans, back squats 515 pounds at the Legends Fitness Center at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, April 24, 2022. Angus uses powerlifting as a means to push his limits, both in lifting and in life. “Powerlifting lets me push my limits and see how far I can go, and this, in turn, pushes me to improve other areas of my life,” added Angus. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Parr)
1st Lt. Anthony Bilal, 332d Expeditionary Contracting Squadron contracting officer, and construction flight commander, deadlifts 535 pounds as part of his powerlifting training routine inside the Legends Fitness Center at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, April 24, 2022. Bilal recently won a powerlifting competition that included the deadlift, back squat, and bench press. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Parr)
Billy Miles, Legends Fitness Center manager, coaches a core strengthening class at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, April 24, 2022. Miles offers personal training and teaches various lifting and core strengthening classes each week. “I take great pride in listening to the patrons and acquiring specific equipment or offering fitness classes to help them meet their goals,” said Miles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Parr)
Tech. Sgt. Adam Angus, 332d Expeditionary Contracting Squadron non-commissioned officer in charge of future plans, back squats 515 pounds at the Legends Fitness Center at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, April 24, 2022. Angus uses powerlifting as a means to push his limits, both in lifting and in life. “Powerlifting lets me push my limits and see how far I can go, and this, in turn, pushes me to improve other areas of my life,” added Angus. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Parr)
1st Lt. Anthony Bilal, 332d Expeditionary Contracting Squadron contracting officer, and construction flight commander, deadlifts 535 pounds as part of his powerlifting training routine inside the Legends Fitness Center at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia, April 24, 2022. Bilal recently won a powerlifting competition that included the deadlift, back squat, and bench press. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Parr)
Airmen often set personal goals while on deployment. Some work toward furthering their education, while others learn to play an instrument or reach financial goals.
Many Airmen assigned to the 332d Air Expeditionary Wing set personal fitness goals to improve their Physical Fitness Assessment scores, overall health and serve as a stress reliever.
“I take great pride in listening to our patrons and acquiring specific equipment or offering fitness classes to help them meet their goals,” said Billy Miles, Legends Fitness Center manager. “By offering monthly fun runs, sports tournaments and challenges we can directly and positively increase morale.”
Airmen determined to meet fitness goals or who need to release stress find time to go to the gym to exercise individually or participate in group activities. A popular pastime for fitness enthusiasts in a deployed environment is weight lifting.

The “Strongest in the AOR” was a recent powerlifting competition sponsored by U.S. Air Force Central Command between all five air expeditionary wings within the AFCENT area of responsibility. 1st Lt. Anthony Bilal, 332d Expeditionary Contracting Squadron contracting officer and construction flight commander, was named this year’s strongest male in the AOR.
“I enjoy challenging myself and competitions like this are a great opportunity to do that with others who enjoy the same thing,” said Bilal. “This competition helped me get a reference point for where I am as I work toward my training goals for a competition in the fall.”
Bilal said the opportunity for increased physical fitness training has helped him focus on perfecting his craft and allowed him to keep his morale high through powerlifting.
“Being Fit to Fight is important to everyday life,” Bilal said. “Powerlifting has helped me embrace it through physical strength and mental fortitude.”
The Air Force stresses the Whole Airman Concept which requires a solid foundation of physical fitness as one of the facets of complete health.
“Members who are physically fit enhance readiness, miss fewer duty days, and decrease the workload on an installation’s medical personnel,” said Miles.
Physical fitness not only improves overall health, it builds resilient warfighters.
“A key part of fitness is creating a deliberate resiliency plan by making it a priority,” said Chief Master Sgt. Sean Milligan, 332d Air Expeditionary Wing command chief. “What better environment than a deployment when you can focus on those personal goals of physical fitness.”

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